I Aspire To Have An Original Thought... One Day

24 | He/Him | Masc Trans NB | Certified Dumbass | Supposedly an Adult

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Posts tagged Crochet:

A little while back I bought some safety eyes for use on amigurumi projects and I finally got to use them on something. So here's a preview of a piece I'm working on, and I must say, already I know I'm gonna be in love with this thing.


An Anonymous user asked:

I saw you had some crochet stuff, specifically thermal stitch around here... yes! I LOVE the thermal stitch, just found my loop scarf I made with the thermal stitch back in the 2019 "polar vortex" or whatever, but yeah, c r o c h e t !

God, I really am loving thermal. My only gripe with it is that it works up so very slowly. But I'll be damned if it doesn't make a very very fabulous fabric. I want to make everything from bags to blankets out of it. A comforter out of thermal would be heaven. And a bag out of it would be durable as all living sin.


bumblingbee -

Today is definitely a day of one project turning into a ton of them. Which is great bc I'm getting things done, but also lol ofc let's do 50 things at once! Nothing bad under the cut, just me rambling about what I'm doing.


today I got down the X stitch mosaic crochet pattern and I have a TON of yarn thats not that great in quality bc it's at least 20 years old. I figured I could make some scarves for friends for Christmas so I popped on fb and asked people for some of their favorite 2 color combos. Got some replies and I was STOKED. Only thing is, all of my yarn is in the attic. So to the attic I go!

the husband and I got the massive tubs of yarn out of the attic and into the living room again (they were in there recently but moved back to the attic so the roomie and my hubby could trip in a cleaner house).

so the living room actually also has a huge box of mine and Brando's clothes in it because we had bedbugs this past July and we just basically stripped and nuked the room. Since it's been like 3 months, we haven't seen any bed bugs, and we regularly vacuum and put down diatomaceous earth, I decided I wanted to move our clothes back into the room so I didn't feel as bad about the stupid amount of yarn in the living room too.

but... I need more space in our room.. I don't neeeeeed it, but I want it. So this means I've now cleaned out and vacuumed the closet and Brando has successfully helped me move our dresser into the closet and helped me put more diatomaceous earth inside and around the dresser in the closet.

but cleaning out the closet first meant pulling out boxes of stuff and putting them on the bed for us to go through too. So now Brando is going through the boxes and I'm folding and putting away clothes.

All of this, because I wanted to make some shitty scarves lol.

Oh! Here's the stitch I figured out btw. It's not a beautiful swatch, but it looks cool and I'm gonna change how I worked it just a little bit.


star-rice -

Sounds like some hella flowy adhd cleaning~ I love and hate when that happens (love it when I have the time to let my brain do it that is). Also jfc that swatch is hella pretty! You'll have to teach me/send me a how-to on it~ god knows I can go wild incorporating it into a bag or some shit.


The pattern I've been working with (the one the pothos is hanging in) is made up of two of these "monstera leaf" pieces. I started working this one yesterday (and had a shit load of fun staring at the colors) and wanted to show it off. It's using a much smaller yarn and as such will make a smaller holder, but hopefully it'll be good for a tiny pot. If not, I think the pattern would be easy to add a third leaf to in order to make it bigger, but that's just a hunch atm.


So for once in like, a billion years, I actually crochetted something and finished it. I'm very happy with how it turned out and I really needed a hanger for this plant since I'm trying to expand my bathroom collection (and will probably need to move some inside for the winter).

Finishing this hanger snowballed into a few things, like finally drilling some holes in this pot to be able to put the pothos in it and then after that I had to put in the effort to drill a hook into the ceiling. Overall I'm extremely pleased with how it all went.

Here's a link the ravelry project I made for this which details the materials used and links to the pattern: https://www.ravelry.com/projects/star0rice/monstera-leaf-plant-hanger


star-rice reblogged star-rice

@lina

So I finally got around to testing doing a double color piece with thermal crochet and? For the most part? It worked pretty much how I was expecting.

This was done with a tiny yarn and a 2.75mm hook, so your milage Will likely vary depending on what yarns you use (this test piece is like 2in x 2in big), but honestly the more no important thing I figured out is that how you carry your yarn (if you carry your yarn) matters.

I prefer carrying the second color with me instead of doing a hard cut every row because I absolutely loath weaving in ends and will avoid it at all costs. On the test piece the back color does through a lot less on the top 3-4 rows (I think it's best visible looking at the blue side. You can see the grey being carried from stitch to stitch). This is because I changed from laying it over the front and crocheting over top of it with the opposing color to laying it across the back and crocheting over itself on the reverse pass. I can elaborate more on that if anyone's interested.


star-rice -

@lina

Yeah, I've never understood what parts of what crochet guidelines belong to American or english crochet language. It's an enigma to me, so I usually just wing everything with whatever references or resources I can put together.

Thermal, though, was definately one that text couldn't help with. I needed a video tutorial for the basic way this stitch operates. I used this one: https://youtu.be/2wFxhgU4oIc

The biggest tip I can offer for keeping consistent with the stitch is to either straight up count or very specifically look for the ridges created by the "top V of a stitch" since you need the leftover one from the previous row and one from the row you're primarily working on. If, on the bag I'm working on, I had missed any of those ridges, they'd be very glaring since the stitch in the end looks so militantly uniform.


@lina

So I finally got around to testing doing a double color piece with thermal crochet and? For the most part? It worked pretty much how I was expecting.

This was done with a tiny yarn and a 2.75mm hook, so your milage Will likely vary depending on what yarns you use (this test piece is like 2in x 2in big), but honestly the more no important thing I figured out is that how you carry your yarn (if you carry your yarn) matters.

I prefer carrying the second color with me instead of doing a hard cut every row because I absolutely loath weaving in ends and will avoid it at all costs. On the test piece the back color does through a lot less on the top 3-4 rows (I think it's best visible looking at the blue side. You can see the grey being carried from stitch to stitch). This is because I changed from laying it over the front and crocheting over top of it with the opposing color to laying it across the back and crocheting over itself on the reverse pass. I can elaborate more on that if anyone's interested.


star-rice reblogged star-rice

I haven't really posted a whole lot about my fiddlings with thermal stitch, especially in round, but it's definitely wild. It's made this relatively stiff, thick fabric and I'm loving it.

I thought it good enough to try a yarn ball bag which I've been needing for a while. Ideally I think if want like a yarn ball cage or something i can set down and not worry about my yarn ball bouncing onto the floor, but I wanted to try this first while getting some experience with the workings of thermal stitch. I might try starching it to see how stiff I can get this fucker. We'll see.

One future project I wanna fuck with is, because of how thermal is structured, you can crochet with two colors and have one side of the fabric be one color and the other side be another. So I do wanna see how that works out eventually, but I'm slightly fixating on this bag.


star-rice -

@lina

okay. So I haven't tested it yet, but theoretically yes. Just given how this stitch presents and works, it should be entirely possible.


I haven't really posted a whole lot about my fiddlings with thermal stitch, especially in round, but it's definitely wild. It's made this relatively stiff, thick fabric and I'm loving it.

I thought it good enough to try a yarn ball bag which I've been needing for a while. Ideally I think if want like a yarn ball cage or something i can set down and not worry about my yarn ball bouncing onto the floor, but I wanted to try this first while getting some experience with the workings of thermal stitch. I might try starching it to see how stiff I can get this fucker. We'll see.

One future project I wanna fuck with is, because of how thermal is structured, you can crochet with two colors and have one side of the fabric be one color and the other side be another. So I do wanna see how that works out eventually, but I'm slightly fixating on this bag.


Okay, so, man, I think I've found a new stitch to obsess over. And its possibly the worst kind of stitch for me to obsess over. I'm already addicted to working with the tiniest weight yarns imaginable, and now I've found a stitch that works up slow and who's resulting fabric feels amazing with smaller yarns.

The stitch is thermal stitch, which, for a small description of how it operates, its like crochetting a double thick fabric with singles only instead of the height increasing by 1 single crochet each time, it goes up by half the height of a single crochet each time. The individual stitches themselves are just single crochets, so it doesn't feel incredibly taxing and like I said, it feels incredible.

But of course, because its me, there was one more logical step I needed to take: doing this shit in round.

And its something else.


So I bought a crochet pattern on brioche crochet because #1 - it looks dope af and, #2 - oddly familiar..... I felt as if I'd done this already in a piece of mine, but I wanted the pattern for the specifics and to kind of compare.

And then I realized exactly what I'd done this with: my fucking bleeding moss stitch bags. One day I decided I wanted to see how how alternating colors every other row would look in bleeding moss only to be very surprised when I ended up with vertical stripes as opposed to horizontal ones. I then quickly expanded my horizons to experiment with it in round with some v cool results.


I lost the original project that I first demonstrated this on, but I did a quick sample using the techniques I know now/would have been using at the time:

First of all, this demonstrates very succintly the increasing pattern used in round (if ya'll were ever wondering about how I was doing that, I always meant to do a tutorial on it, but its not as easy to understand with words) but its literally the jumping off point for having a good understanding of the brioche techniques used in the pattern I bought and I discovered all of this on accident. Literally years before I would formally be able to put a name to it (I didn't know this was called Brioche or Mosaic crochet until a day ago).

And this is wild to me because I realized part of the potential when working with double colored extened moss while decreasing (not shown, but decreasing brings two branches to a point), I just never made the tiny leap to realizing how easy it would be to etch wild patterns into something because I figured it'd be too complex to want to work out the intricacies.

Anyway, the tl;dr of why im making this post is that I'm absolutely fascinated by what is the equivalent of convergent evolution amongst craftsmen (which isn't uncommon at all, esp in crochet where its basics are simple but there's a lot of freedom to it if you're willing to get creative, but since we're all using the same basic technique, we're bound to 'discover' the same things). I'm not gonna say I haven't been through this before with other stuff, but its definately been a while and this is the most complex thing I've developed all on my own only to find it word for word somewhere else.

Which is not to say I've been doing this technique the exact same as in this pattern. Far from it, though the basic idea is the same. This was partly why I bought it, to fill in that gap where years earlier I'd tapped out and paid it no mind. There's obviously more to learn here, more to explore and more creativity to be had. Even if I had completely understood how to balance the stitches and properly direct the design before this, for something I had to figure out the intricacies of on my own, I'm going to absolutely love reading up on how someone else decided to go about certain things.

I love the evolution of the creative exchange of ideas too. I know its sort of very niche depending on where you are on the internet, but I'm slowly amassing a huge pool of resources to better my craft with and I'm already a slut for community discussion of things.


star-rice reblogged star-rice
star-rice -

Absolutely addicted to crocheting little bags in bleeding moss stitch with superfine weight yarn and a 2.75mm hook.


star-rice -

Comfort activity


star-rice -

@coffee its Lion Brand, Summer Nights series. The color is called "treasure island". I found it at Wal-Mart and impulse bought it. I thought it was pretty too. It came in like 4 different colors too. I usually don't like yarns with a bit of sparkle in it, but this looked pretty and doesn't feel bad at all (usually the tinsel or whatever is too rough for my liking.)


star-rice reblogged star-rice
star-rice -

Absolutely addicted to crocheting little bags in bleeding moss stitch with superfine weight yarn and a 2.75mm hook.


star-rice -

Comfort activity


Absolutely addicted to crocheting little bags in bleeding moss stitch with superfine weight yarn and a 2.75mm hook.


bumblingbee -

it is not often that I do creative/crafty things. I have been working on this shawl though and I'm so pleased by my progress so far.


bumblingbee -


update!!


star-rice -

Fuck yeah! Is it going to be those three colors repeating all the way down?


Don't feel like writing up anything big about this piece, but I did wanna show it off bc it's so pretty and coming along quite nicely.


Lots of blue. Dirty desk


I was just trying to take a picture of the shame cowl I've been working on and realized that not only do I have a lot of blue on my desk, but I had a lot of similar blues on my desk and it would make a pretty neat photo.


I'm very much stuck between "I can only crochet at work" and "a larger project I want to start is not only big but will require a lot of attention, trial/error and modification, ie something only suitable for home".

I'm big excited to one day soon have a living room with furniture that I would feel comfortable on since my problem presently is that crochetting in bed is a back pain nightmare and crochetting at my computer is both ineffective and uncomfortable (and I usually will only if I have a pattern best accessed from my desktop instead of my phone).

I miss having a chair that would attempt to eat me while I grow more and more absorbed in my project and the furniture.


Doing another bag~

Here's a quarter for size comparison:

The yarn is pretty tiny. I'm working with a 2.75mm hook in bleeding moss stitch, as usual.


crownedwithwisteria asked:

I would love to have a tutorial on the moss stitch sometime if you don't mind!! (and I'd love to learn how to do it in round too, your little bag is so cute and I really want to try to make one now!! XD)

Cool okay. So I realized when I started looking for an already written up tutorial for moss stitch, that what I refer to casually as 'moss stitch' is not the traditional moss stitch, but it does hinge heavily on the same principal.

So here's a very good demonstration of normal moss stitch done with single crochets:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rF1A_w7U4s8 However, the moss stitch I do (and I cannot for the life of me find the original page I learned it from) I think was called bleeding moss stitch, and it was done with half double crochets and instead of just putting the stitch in the chain from the previous row, you put it in the stitch of the half double in the row below that. - The more I reread that sentence, the more I feel like its super confusing, so I figured i'd make a full on tutorial for this.


So, this version of moss starts off very similar:

After chaining out your foundation row, just alternate between chaining and putting single crochets in every other stitch.

Now, instead of putting single crochets in the spaces you left open on row one (as you would with traditional moss stitch) instead, put a half double crochet in the chains you skipped on the foundation row, filling in those gaps. Each row, like regular moss stitch, can't start or end with a chain, so instead put a single crochet there to make your edges neat.

The next row expands on the same established pattern, but shows off the other way to start and end the round as to correctly stagger the gaps and maintain neat edges. This time you're putting the half double crochets into the tops of the single crochets made in row 1. Repeat rows 2 and 3 until you're satisfied with the length of the piece.

To finish off the pattern and make it all nice and pretty and square, instead of chaining between half doubles, you'll want to put single crochets in the tops of the row 3s half double crochets.

The traditional moss pattern ends up feeling sort of lacey, especially if you do it with half double or double crochets. But this version is much sturdier and it actually comes out feeling like a fabric that you can use for just about anything. When I do my pot holders I always use bleeding moss, I've adapted it into bags (which, its gets crazy on those increases, lemme tell ya), literally anything that requires a square panel, I much prefer to put moss stitch on it because I love the texture and it can work up very cool patterns when used with a variegated yarn.


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